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Cigar Spirits: StogieGuys.com A-Z Bourbon Guide (Part 2)

26 Jun 2013

StogieGuys.com is, first and foremost, a cigar publication. Every day for seven years, we’ve published an article written to interest the informed cigar smoking reader. Our only editorial bias is pro-cigar; we are opposed to tobacco taxes, smoking bans, and cigar regulations.

bourbon

Despite our narrow focus on cigars, over the years we’ve written quite a bit about bourbons, given how well they tend to pair with a fine cigar. To that end, here’s a StogieGuys.com guide to bourbon. (This is part two; part one was published yesterday.) In addition to a link to the full write-up, I’ve included my take on the defining characteristics of each whiskey.

Obviously, this isn’t every bourbon available (and we’ll certainly be adding to our Spirits articles with more bourbon write-ups in the future), but it’s a pretty thorough overview of what’s out there. To that end, here is the Cliffs Notes version of our coverage of bourbon. And of course, each article has a few recommended cigar pairings:

Jefferson’s Presidential Select 18 Year – Phenomenal, though a pricey bourbon with spice, wood, and vanilla.

Jefferson’s Reserve – Elegant older bourbon with lots of vanilla and wood.

Jim Beam Distiller’s Series – Quality for the price ($21) and a versatile mixer or sipper.

Johnny Drum Private Stock – Approachable with plenty of spice.

Knob Creek Single Barrel – Barrel-strength bourbon that’s well-balanced with plenty of vanilla and wood.

Larceny – Sweet, rounded, and lively. Good value and an excellent alternative to Maker’s Mark.

Michter’s 10 Year Single Barrel – Chared oak and woody. Nice but pricey.

Noah’s Mill – Old, balanced, woody, and spicy. And also quite delicious.

Pure Kentucky Small Batch – Overly woody. Lacks balance but well-priced if you like old-tasting bourbons.

Russell’s Reserve 10 Year – More refined small batch variation of Wild Turkey. Still has plenty of spice along with roasted flavors.

St. George Breaking & Entering – Balanced blend of straight bourbons with cherry and caramel notes.

Van Winkle Family Reserve 12 Year  – Hard to find but worth it with thick butterscotch flavors.

Wathen’s Single Barrel – Honey and spice with a long finish.

Wild Turkey Rare Breed – Lively variation of classic Wild Turkey with plenty of spice and wood.

Willet Pot Still Reserve – Smooth sipping bourbon, but you pay extra for the fancy bottle.

Woodford Reserve – Bold yet approachable. A well-crafted classic.

Woodford Reserve Double Oaked – Oaky, complex, and nuanced, though you pay for the privilege.

OK, technically our guide only goes to “W” because we’ve yet to find a bourbon that starts with Z. But keep an eye out for more additions (I see a  couple prospects on my shelf as I write this). And, in the meantime, check out our general guide to pairing spirits with a cigar.

-Patrick S

photo credit: Stogie Guys

Drew Estate

2 Responses to “Cigar Spirits: StogieGuys.com A-Z Bourbon Guide (Part 2)”

  1. TRIMARKC Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 9:09 pm #

    Great 2-parter article Patrick! I've been trying out several new bourbons over the past year, and have learned there is a significant range of characteristics. For me, the most prominent in my enjoyment is "dry" vs "sweet" — I tend to like the sweeter side (e.g., Four Roses, Knob Creek, etc), since the dryer bourbons taste too much like whiskey or scotch to me.
    I'd be interested in seeing a chart or infographic on bourbon brands that shows the range of "dry" to "sweet" that my local liquor expert has been trying to teach me!

  2. TriMarkC Thursday, June 27, 2013 at 10:08 pm #

    Great 2-parter article Patrick! I've been trying out several new bourbons over the past year, and have learned there is a significant range of characteristics. For me, the most prominent in my enjoyment is "dry" vs "sweet" — I tend to like the sweeter side (e.g., Four Roses, Knob Creek, etc), since the dryer bourbons taste too much like whiskey or scotch to me.

    I'd be interested in seeing a chart or infographic on bourbon brands that shows the range of "dry" to "sweet" that my local liquor expert has been trying to teach me!