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Cigar Review: Cohiba Royale Toro Royale

26 May 2020

The last time I wrote a full review of a Cohiba was in 2017 when Cohiba Blue had just come out. This was around the same time Sean Williams of El Primer Mundo was introduced as the new Cohiba brand ambassador. “I don’t know this for sure, but my sense is the Cohiba marketing team was aiming for a differentiated look that expressed modernity and approachability,” I wrote. “The purpose of Cohiba Blue, after all, seems to be to attract more (presumably younger) consumers to the brand at a less intimidating price point.”

This April, General Cigar announced a new Cohiba line that (as far as pricing is concerned) throws caution to the wind. Cohiba Royale—dubbed the “fullest-bodied Cohiba expression to date”—is an ultra-premium offering that retails for $24-$29 per cigar.

The Cohiba Royale recipe calls for a sun-grown Nicaraguan Broadleaf wrapper, a Dominican Piloto Cubano binder, and a filler blend that includes tobaccos from Honduras (Jamastran) and Nicaragua (Estelí and Jalapa). Each leaf has been aged five to six years. “All of the tobaccos that comprise Cohiba Royale are hand-selected and deeply aged, representing the best of the best tobacco growing regions in the world,” said Williams in a press release. “The result is a cigar that is as bold as it is refined, befitting of the Cohiba name.”

Cohiba Royale is made at General Cigar’s HATSA factory in Danlí—making it the first Cohiba to be crafted in Honduras. It is packaged in five- and ten-count boxes and offered in three sizes: Gran Royale (4.5 x 52), Robusto Royale (5.5 x 54), and Toro Royale (6 x 50).

Aesthetics are not the most important trait of any cigar. That said, when you pay $29, it should be a fine-looking specimen—and, unfortunately, the Toro Royale falls short of the expectations set by its lofty price. The cap is borderline sloppy with cracks, lumps, and edges that were ineffectively smoothed down. And the seams that run the length of the cigar are likewise not as tight as they should be, and therefore prone to cracking. Other characteristics of the rough, mottled wrapper I am willing to chalk up to the rustic-ness of Broadleaf.

The real test, though, is in the taste. As advertised, the Toro Royale starts full-bodied and strong with an intense profile of black pepper, espresso, and leather. It’s the kind of powerful intro that leads you to believe there will eventually be a nicotine penance to pay—even for a seasoned cigar veteran.

After a half inch, the strength and body pull back considerably. The core flavors remain, but now the taste is better-balanced, sweeter, and more interesting. The new-arrival notes include cocoa powder and black cherry. There are also some unwelcome flavors, most notably a stale bitterness and a chewy meatiness.

From a construction standpoint, it’s all good news. The burn is straight and the cigar stays lit even when not puffed frequently. The ash holds well, the draw is smooth, and the smoke production is voluminous and aromatic.

That isn’t nearly enough to merit a recommendation, however. I smoked three for this review—each provided by General Cigar—and I’m afraid the aesthetics, flavor, and price are all disappointing. I am left with no choice but to settle on a poor score of two stogies out of five.

[To read more StogieGuys.com cigar reviews, please click here.]

Patrick A

photo credit: Stogie Guys

One Response to “Cigar Review: Cohiba Royale Toro Royale”

  1. Relic Sunday, May 31, 2020 at 11:58 am #

    Patrick,

    Thanks for taking 1 (or 3 I guess) for the team. I hold a low view of General’s Cohiba lines and am unlikely to buy one without first seeing a positive review. Sorry to say, this two star review confirms what I suspected. Leave it to General Cohiba to screw up Nicaraguan tobacco. I’ll stick with the original Padron line for a third of the cost. Again, I appreciate your sacrifice!

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